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2 edition of Water binding and rheological properties of gelatin, carrageenan and starch gels found in the catalog.

Water binding and rheological properties of gelatin, carrageenan and starch gels

Diane L. Knutson

Water binding and rheological properties of gelatin, carrageenan and starch gels

by Diane L. Knutson

  • 232 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gelation.,
  • Gelatin.,
  • Starch.,
  • Rheology.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Diane L. Knutson.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 64 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages64
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16565681M

      It is widely used in the food industry for a broad range of applications because of its water binding, thickening and gelling properties. In the meat industry, carrageenan is used as a gelling agent in canned meats and petfoods and it allows reduction in fat content in comminuted meat products like frankfurters (Candoğan and Kolsarici a, b).Cited by:   Shchipunov YA, Chesnokov AV. Carrageenan gels in skim milk: formation and rheological properties. Colloid J. ; – doi: /A [Google Scholar] Sikora M, Kowalski S, Tomasik P, Sady M. Rheological and sensory properties of dessert sauces thickened by starch-xanthan gum by:

    The aim of this work was to study the rheological properties and microstructure of pea protein/k-carrageenan/starch gels as affected by different cooling conditions. The glass transition temperatures (Tg) of various low-moisture galactans, such as agars and carrageenans, were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and occasionally by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The shift in heat flow on the DSC thermogram was detected for all samples. The typical thermally activated relaxation process was observed in the DMA thermogram for an agar .

    The aim of this work was to study the rheological properties and microstructure of pea protein/k-carrageenan/starch gels as affected by different cooling conditions. water binding zones during. (b) Starch Gels (c) Mixed polysaccharide gels (d) Pectin (e) Carrageenan (f) Alginate etc. By measuring the force:deformation relationship and force required to rupture the gel, enough information can be obtained to classify gels into categories such as brittle, firm, weak, elastic etc. (Mitchell, ).File Size: 86KB.


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Water binding and rheological properties of gelatin, carrageenan and starch gels by Diane L. Knutson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Carrageenan is a mixture of water‐soluble, linear, sulfated galactans. Pectin, carragennans, and gelatin are commercially important hydrophilic polysaccharides and have wide applications in the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries as gelling, thickening, stabilizing, and Author: Dipali R.

Bagal‐Kestwal, M.H. Pan, Been‐Huang Chiang. The water‐binding properties of four gelling macromolecules (carrageenan, agar, potato starch and gelatin) were studied through measurement of the vapor pressure of water in the gels, suction pressure and Flory‐Huggins x‐value developed by the gel, and reduced mobility of water protons as measured by the spin lattice relaxation time from by: Abstract.

The influence of an anionic polysaccharide, κ-carrageenan, on the rheological properties of low-concentration ( wt %) gelatin gels has been studied in a wide range of low polysaccharide concentrations (1 × 10 −3 –5 × 10 −1 wt %) at a temperature of °C and pH values slightly higher than the isoelectric point of gelatin.

The parameters characterizing the rheological Cited by: In fact, the gel strength of the FG/CG mixtures (G) can be fitted using a simple “blending law” (Kasapis, ): (2) 1 G = ∅ F G F + ∅ C G C where G F (= g) and G C (= g) are the gel strength of the fish gelatin and the carrageenan alone, and ϕ F and ϕ c (= 1-ϕ F) are the volume fractions of the gelatin and the carrageenan in the by: The water-binding capacities of gelatin, potato starch, and carrageenan gels were measured by the use of a filter paper suction pressure method.

It was found that the gelatin and potato starch behaved similarly over a wide range of concentration but had poor water binding compared with carrageenan.

Carrageenan emulsion gels containing sunflower oil were prepared using three different commercial carrageenan grades (κ-C, ι-C and λ-C). The effect of the carrageenan and salt content, as well as the oil:water ratio, on the emulsion gel strength was evaluated through a response surface methodology.

rheological properties [3]. Hydrocolloids are polymers interacting strongly with water. Guar gum, pectin, carrageenan, starch, salep and gelatin are most frequently used hydrocolloids as food additives. In the food industry, they are primarily used for thickening, gelling.

This review covers the rheology of gels formed by macromolecular food additives. In particular agar, alginate, carrageenan, gelatin, pectin and microbial polysaccharide gels are considered. Empirical and fundamental techniques that have been applied to gels are listed and the relationship between rheological parameters and sensory assessment of Cited by: So, the rheological properties of concentrate emulsions are strongly dependent on the κ-carrageenan/gelatin w/w ratio, Z, in an aqueous phase.

Increasing this ratio (i.e. increasing the polysaccharide concentration) resulted in a decrease in the yield stress, viscosity, and storage by: 7.

The concentration dependence of the rheological properties were investigated for simple gels of κ-carrageenan (C) and gelatin (G) in concentration ranges of % (w/v) and % (w/v), respectively.

Mixed carrageenan-gelatin gels of various mixing ratios were prepared, i.e., C-G (), C-G () and C-G (), and the effects of mixing. Water gel strength of nano sized food hydrocolloids blended with kappa-carrageenan The cassia gum with the kappa carrageenan had also found better synergistic effect than the above said.

Carrageenan chains seem to be trapped on the surface of starch granules. The 3D picture built with several images acquired at increasing depth in the sample (34 μm in z direction), confirms that starch granules are completely covered by carrageenan chains trapped on the surface (Fig.

2 b).Cited by: charide gels. Therefore, we have previously investigated the gelation mechanism of polysaccharides in aqueous solutions at a molecular level using a rheogoniometer. In the course of the rheological study, we proposed gelation mechanism for κ-carrageenan [1,2], -carragee- ι nan [3], agarose +(agar) [4], gellan gum [5], amylose [6,7],File Size: KB.

Gels may be formed in either water or milk. Various blends of carrageenans in the presence of various cations (K +, Ca 2+, proteins) will form gels that can be either clear or turbid, either rigid or elastic, either tough or tender, and heat stable 3 or thermally reversible (although never.

The mechanism of gelation depends on the nature of the gelling agent(s) and on the conditions of gel formation like the temperature, the presence of ions, the pH, and the concentration of gelling agents, etc. Characterization of gels can be performed in several ways of which rheological measurements are frequently by: Agar-agar and carrageenan are extracted from seaweed; gelatin is produced by hydrolysis of proteins of bovine and fish origins, and pectin is extracted from citrus peel and apple pomace.

Abstract. Many foods may be considered to be gels. Rheological studies can provide much useful information on sol-gel and gel-sol transition, and gel point, as well as on the characteristics of by:   O’Neill and others () investigated rheological properties of heat‐induced actomyosin gels with an Instron Universal Testing Instrument and found that gelation properties were markedly affected by protein concentration, pH, and heating temperature.

With increasing the protein concentration (30 to 60 mg/mL) and the heating temperature (55 Cited by: The Rheological Properties of Carrageenan gel.

The Rheological Properties of Carrageenan gel. On account of its properties, carrageenan gel is often used in food industry as the thickening, gelatinizing, suspending, emulsifying and stabilizing agents. Besides, it is also widely used in medicine and fine chemical industries.

Request PDF | On Jun 1,Li Cheng Sow and others published Effects of κ-carrageenan on the structure and rheological properties of fish gelatin | Find, read and cite all the research you. The rheological properties of κ-carrageenan helices dispersed in an aqueous medium, which prevents aggregation of helices, were investigated.

A dispersion of % w/w nonaggregated κ-carrageenan helices exhibited gel-like dynamic mechanical spectra at 20 °C; that is, the storage modulus G‘ predominated over the loss modulus G‘‘ in the entire frequency range examined (− rad/s).until gelatin starch (GS) formation.

Then, the solution of gelatin starch was cured at temperature of 80 OC for hour time period with continuous stirring. The product of gelatin starch polymer was then poured on plastic sheet and dried at room temperature.

Moreover, additional drying on starch-urea.CHEMICAL COMPOSITION Carrageenans have the common feature of being linear polysaccharides with a repeating structure of alternating 1,3-linked b-D-galactophyranosyl arid 1,4-linked a-D-galactophyranosyl units (Figure 1).The 3-linked units occur as the 2- and 4-sulfate, or unsulfated, while the 4-linked units occur as the 2-sulfate, the 2,6-disulfate, the 3,6-anhydride, and the 3,6-anhydride